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10 Essentials for the Outdoor Photographer

10 Camera Bag Essentials for Outdoor Photography

In the world of hiking, camping and backpacking, there are the “10 Essentials.” It’s a universal list of 10 things you should always have with you when setting out to explore the wilderness. It includes things like a first aid kit, water, food, a map, sunscreen, matches, etc.

If you plan on heading into nature to take some pictures, you should keep the 10 essentials in mind — even if it’s just a short local trip. Things can turn bad in an instant and many people who die or nearly die in the wild were no more than a few miles from the nearest help.

But in addition to the 10 essentials, I thought I’d share with you my list of “10 Camera Bag Essentials” for the outdoor photographer. These are items gleaned from 11 years of shooting that I’ve found to be invaluable for outdoor photography. Some items will stay in your bag all the time while others you can throw in at the last minute.

So in no particular order, here they are...

10 Camera Bag Essentials for Outdoor Photography - Lens PenLens Pen

Whoever invented this thing is a genius. A lens pen is a $7 item that’ll last you years and will come in handy more times than you can count. It’s shaped like a thick pen (wouldn’t you know it) and consists of a retractable brush on one end with a soft chamois pad on the other. The brush is great for sweeping dust off your lenses and filters while the chamois pad will buff out finger prints and smudges. With a handy clip built in, this thing slides nicely into a shirt pocket so it’s always at the ready.

Lens Cloths (lots and lots of lens cloths)

Put a lens cloth in every main compartment of your bag, inside and out. It seems every time you really need a lens cloth, the colors in the sky are at their peak and you only have about 90 seconds before the moment is gone forever. You don’t want to be fumbling around trying to find that one pocket where you keep your lens cloth, so just stash one in every single compartment you can, then you’ll always find one no matter what pocket you check first. And if you have some extra cleaning cloths from your sunglasses, just throw those in — they are the same ones you buy at a camera store.

10 Camera Bag Essentials for Outdoor Photography - Multi-ToolMulti-Tool

Two words: 127 Hours. If you saw that movie, you know what I’m talking about.

...alright that’s not the real reason you should have a good multi-tool in your bag. You should invest in a decent multi-tool with pliers and screwdrivers because they are an endlessly valuable tool to have at hand when dealing with mechanical equipment like cameras and tripods. They can be used for everything from fixing a loose tripod screw to extracting a fishbone lodged in your brother’s throat (which is something mine has been used for). Also, throw any allen wrenches into your bag that may have come with your tripod.

Handkerchief

You could also pack a small towel in your bag, but I like handkerchiefs because they fold up small, they’re lightweight and they can be used for a multitude of tasks. If your camera gets drenched from a rogue wave, it’ll mop up the seawater. If you find yourself in a light rain, you can drape it over your camera for some basic shielding. Or if it’s just too damn hot out, you can soak it in a creek and wrap it around your neck for some good relief.

10 Camera Bag Essentials for Outdoor Photography - Flashlight and HeadlampFlashlight/Headlamp

I’d recommend bringing both a headlamp and a flashlight. An LED headlamp is great for keeping your hands free while you work in the dark. A flashlight with better reach than your headlamp is good for the walk/hike back to the car. I use a Petzl headlamp and an LED Mini Maglite flashlight myself, but there are tons of great brands out there.

Warm Clothes

Weather can change in an instant, especially once the sun drops, so I rarely leave for a photo shoot without a jacket in my bag — even in the summer. In fact, I leave gloves in my camera bag at all times. Gloves are the kind of thing that hardly ever come in handy, but when they do, they really come in handy...uh, no pun intended. But get some gloves with a good grippy palm so you can still handle your camera.

10 Camera Bag Essentials for Outdoor Photography - CompassCompass

Aside from the obvious “find your way out of the wilderness” implications, a compass is a great tool to have in your bag so you can better predict a sunset or sunrise. It’s easy to get turned around as to which way is west when you’re in a new location, especially in the middle of the day. A compass will aid you in figuring out where to be for when the sunset or sunrise rolls around.

Smart Phone

With thousands of comprehensive apps out there, a smart phone is a smart item (haha - I kill me...) to keep with you on a shoot. I have apps for checking the tides, the sunset and sunrise times, the moon phases, moonrise times and more. Also, you can take notes about what filters you used, what your thought process was or any little tidbits you want to remember when reviewing the pictures later. But don’t rely on your smart phone for something more important than just tide information or sunset times. Don’t count on it for a compass or GPS because your smart phone has batteries, and batteries die.

Cash

Many places you’ll want to shoot require a parking or entrance fee that must be in cash. Of course, when you show up, that’s the one time you forgot to get cash. So, you may want to just leave $20 in your camera bag at all times. Break it up into some ones and fives, too, so you can cover those $3 honor system parking fee drop boxes.

10 Camera Bag Essentials for Outdoor Photography - BatteriesBatteries

Yeah. This is a no-brainer. But it’s so important that I’m pointing it out anyway. Make sure your camera batteries have a charge before you go out and bring some extras if there’s any risk they’ll die before you can get back to a wall outlet. But make sure to bring batteries for any other powered devices you might have with you. That includes batteries for your flashlight, headlamp and GPS unit.

So there you have some good “10 Essentials” type basics to think about when packing your camera bag. I keep these in mind even if I’m just hitting a local beach that’s no more than 3 minutes from civilization.

I also tend to bring water with me no matter how long I plan on being out. You’re usually out longer than you intended and you’ll burn a few more calories than you thought you would. Nothing sucks more than leaving a good sunset early because you just couldn’t take the thirst anymore. Same goes for a snack. Throw some trail mix in your bag and never miss the good light because you were starving.

Algae and Rocks in Crystal Cove

Rocks in Crystal Cove State Park, CA

In this past summer session of my Landscape Photography Class in Irvine, I took my class down to Crystal Cove State Park for the field shoot. We lucked out with a super low tide at sunset, but the sunset itself wasn't anything to write home about. No clouds made for a lackluster sky - typical of July in SoCal.

But with the tide so low, we had access to tons of rocks that were absolutely blanketed in bright green algae, which made for great foreground subjects. My best results came from the light a few minutes after sunset. The purple tones in the sky at this time of day complemented the green algae well.

Rocks in Crystal Cove State Park, CA

Rocks in Crystal Cove State Park, CA

And just a quick reminder that registration is open for the next session of my Landscape Photography Class, which starts October 6th. Info on that here.

 

Fall Landscape Photography Class

Registration for the fall session of my
Landscape Photography Class at the Irvine Fine Arts Center is now open!

The previous installment of this class filled up
to max capacity and is likely to happen again!
Don't miss out! Class starts Oct 8th!

For more information about this class and to sign up,
just follow this link and type "104857" into the course number search field.