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Outdoor Photographer – March 2009

I am extremely happy to report that my article entitled "Shoot More, Process Less" has been published in the March 2009 issue of Outdoor Photographer along with eight of my photos!

AND MY PICTURE MADE THE COVER!

This is a really big deal for me because when I started getting serious about photography quite a few years back, one of my biggest goals was to have an article published in Outdoor Photographer and to make the cover. Now I can say I did it (and just shy of my 22nd birthday)! I'm so excited!

I've been subscribing to Outdoor Photographer for a long time now because I truly feel it is the highest quality photography magazine out there today.†It's very well laid out with great photography and top-notch articles.†I owe a lot of my knowledge to the articles found in this magazine.†

Needless to say, I had to take a ton of pictures of this accomplishment and post it here on my blog. I'm not trying to toot my own horn or anything, but I'm just so happy!

The cover.

Pages 1-2 of my article.

Pages 3-4.

Page 5.

Some vanity shots (I'm a dork):

The entire article is also online at the Outdoor Photographer website. You can read it here. My article is featured on the homepage of www.OutdoorPhotographer.com towards the middle. It was at the top for a little bit and, luckily, I got some screenshots of it.

I'd love to hear from anybody who has seen this issue and/or has read my article. I've heard from a few people across the country already and I'd love to get more feedback.†

Website Updates

Just wanted to spread the word that the nature section of my website has been renovated to include a new Teaching section. It has information about my private photography lessons, classes and future workshops.

Some Sweet Abandoned Buildings

We had some cloud cover coming through Orange County a couple weeks back that have really made some nice sunsets. I went to my usual spot of Quail Hill one day and I considered hitting up the beach, but when I went out on the 21st, I was itching for some new material. I didn't care if it was nature, urban or a mix, I just wanted some new subject matter for a change.

Anyone from Orange County will know how hard this is. You can only shoot the same beaches so many times and battle the track housing for so long before it gets old. Orange County's nice, but it's no Washington state. If I wanted new material, I knew it wasn't going to be anything fantastic if it was within a 50-mile radius. So, I decided to explore.

They recently opened up this hot-air-like balloon that takes people above the future "Great Park" on the former El Toro Marine Base. I'd never been before, but I thought I'd try exploring around there. Well, I'm sure glad I did, because I found some amazing old buildings on this retired Marine Base.†

I drove along an empty road, waiting for some cop or barricade to stop me from going any further, but nothing did. So I kept driving until I got to a deserted building that looked like it used to be some sort of utility building (there were a ton of circuit breakers and pipes and warehouse rooms and stuff). Windows were broken, the asphalt was cracked and overrun by bushes, doors were left open - it looked just so awesome. All the textures and character of this place were screaming to be photographed.†

That afternoon I managed to get some pretty good landscapes of this dilapidated building at sunset. The entire time I was shooting, no one came to kick me out, no one was around, I was completely alone and having a great time. Here are the resultant pictures:

Then I went back a second day to scout around inside the building. This was a little more creepy but just as awesome. The big, cavernous rooms were dark and bare except for some serious spider webs around the doors and a few tumbleweeds. I snapped off a few self-portraits while I was there:

Unfortunately, though, the all-too-bored Irvine PD came and kicked me out on the third visit there. Good thing, too. Us pesky photographers are always getting into trouble, defacing property and putting otherwise unused property to good use.†

The moral to this story: Exploration is a fun and important technique to finding good shots, almost as important as remaining discreet when doing it.