Nick Carver Photography Blog

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Photography Tips: Shoot Through Something

Skill Level: Beginner

My forte is landscape photography. It's what I live for. But I do enjoy myself some close-up/macro photography on occasion.

One thing I like to do in some of my macro shots, especially with flowers, is to position myself so something is between my lens and my subject (like some flowers, leaves, grass, etc). Then I shoot "through" this foreground element to my main subject. With the inherently small depth of field you get with macro work and a wide aperture, that foreground element will blur out nicely. If the aperture is wide enough and if the foreground element is close enough to you, this foreground element will blur beyond recognition - it will just become a blurry mass of color and shape.

The result is an image that's a little more artistic than your straight-forward macro shot. With that foreground element completely blurry, the image softens up while still maintaining sharpness in your main subject. Everything around your subject will become silky smooth abstract shapes and colors, but your main subject will be sharp. It's great for pulling more attention to your subject.

I shot through the blurry flowers in the foreground but focused my lens on the three flowers in the background. This made a more creative and artistic picture than your typical close-up.

If you leave your camera's AF focusing points on auto-selection, the camera will try to focus on the foreground element that's closest to you. In order for this technique to work so that the subject you really want in focus is in focus, you'll either need to select the focusing point yourself or use manual focus (I'd recommend manual focus).

Give it a try. Just put something between you and your subject, then focus on your subject. The small DOF will do the rest.

Photography Tips: What is a Polarizer?

This is the first in a series of photographic quick tips and how-to's I will be posting periodically. They will be categorized by difficulty level (Beginner, Intermediate & Pro) and can be found by using the "Tips & How-To" drop down menu at the top of this blog. You can also perform a search in the search box above to see if there are any posts on what you're looking for. Enjoy!

Skill Level: Beginner

Circular polarizing filters are pretty amazing, but I often find new photographers have purchased a polarizer not really knowing why they would need it or how to use it. Camera store salesmen seem to tack these things on to a sale without fully letting the customer (you) know why you need it. Well, that's where this post comes in.


Here I used a circular polarizer to darken the blue sky & make the clouds "pop"

The first thing to know about polarizers is that there are 2 types: linear and circular polarizers. I won't go into the details of how they are structurally different or how these filters work (for that, check out this great post over at BobAtkin.com), but understand that all modern-day DSLRs require a circular polarizer, not a linear one. Linear polarizers will cause the metering and autofocus to work incorrectly on today's cameras. Also, keep in mind that there is no easy way to tell a linear polarizer from a circular polarizer short of the manufacturer's label - linear polarizers are round just like circular polarizers.

The second thing to know about polarizing filters is their purpose in photography, and that's to reduce/cut out reflections and to darken blue skies. Polarizers seem almost magical when you view this effect through your viewfinder. That blue sky will darken to a beautiful indigo without touching the clouds or the foreground, and that reflection off the water's surface will vanish into thin air. Check out these side-by-side comparisons to see the effect:

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Without Polarizer _________ With Polarizer

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Without Polarizer ____                                _____ With Polarizer

The last thing you need to know about polarizing filters is how to use them. You'll notice the polarizer has a tint to it (it's impossible to make a crystal clear polarizer). This will cut the light coming through your lens a bit, but don't worry, your camera will take it into account and compensate for it automatically (if you're in any auto-exposure mode). The effectiveness of a polarizer is dictated by its rotation, which is why they typically have a double collar that allows you to rotate the filter without unscrewing it, so just look through your viewfinder and rotate the filter until you get the desired effect. There's no hard rule to this, just rotate it until you get the effect you want.

And there you have it! It's that simple! Now head out and give it a try!

Photographer’s Tools: Tide Charts

Boulders Along Laguna Beach

Low TideIn this first installment of my "Photographer's Tools" series (wherein I will discuss tools and tips to help photographers make better pictures), I will cover an often overlooked tool for photographers: Tide Charts. Whether you live by the ocean like me or you are planning on taking a trip to the coast, you better make room in your camera bag for tide charts (figuratively of course, who really needs to "make room" for a tide chart? That's just ridiculous).

In my own experience, and I think many photographers would agree, the success of a good image lies in the pre-shoot preparation. Whether you're shooting a scenic or a portrait, it's all about how prepared you are when the time comes to click the shutter. Tide charts can give a little window to the future that will help make your coastal shots that much better.

Mr. KrabsI personally love to include rocks and tide pools in my coastal pictures. Rock formations along the beach and boulders strewn across the white sand seem to make a regular beach picture so much more unique. They add texture, weight and shadows to otherwise mediocre photos. The mussels and sea life found in tide pools at low tide create even more interesting additions to a landscape and are amazing photo subjects all by themselves. With tide charts, you can find out to the minute when the tide will be at its lowest. You can plan ahead knowing that these rocks at this location will be exposed at this time of day. And by scouting out the location ahead of time, you can even get a mental image picture of your shot before you set foot on the beach.

ShapesFor example, I know the beach of Crystal Cove State Park in California like the back of my hand. When I looked at the tide charts the other day and saw that low tide would be at 6:57pm, I knew this park would have some interesting rocks and tide pools to play with for some sunset shots. I didn't waste any time looking around other beaches or deciding where to go. Since I knew the tide would be low, I knew Crystal Cove was the place to be.

This brings me to my next point: I only went out and took pictures on this day BECAUSE the tide was low at sunset. Normally I don't bring my camera out for any landscape work if there are no clouds in the sky. I am bored easily by cloudless skies and this day was clear as a summer afternoon (seeing as how it WAS a summer afternoon). But I knew low tide at sunset would be a pretty good bet, even with no clouds, so I packed my gear and headed out. Had I not checked the charts and had I not known what gems low tide could bring me, I would have stayed in and done other work. I'm sure glad I went, because I had a lot of fun and was really pleased with the results.


With amazing devices like the iPhone, tide charts can be at your finger tips at any moment in any place. I don't have to print out a tide chart every month and remember to slip it in my bag, I have all the information at my fingertips. A great site that I have bookmarked on my iPhone is www.tidesonline.com. Its simple interface and logical layout make for a great online tide chart.

Just After Sunset

Low Tide at SunsetThese charts are not only valuable for the low tides. If you know of a place, for instance, that would be perfect at high tide at sunrise, use the chart to find a date when the high tide is right when you need it. Or if you know that the waves are biggest at high tide at this particular beach, find a date when the high tide is at the right time and get out and shoot them.

If you do go out at low tide and are navigating across tide pools, please be responsible. Tread lightly and watch where you put your foot. That slimy rock might actually be a sea slug and those mussels latched onto the rocks are not, in fact, indestructible and they are living animals. And be smart. If you know it's mid-tide but the tide is coming IN, don't put your camera bag where the tide will catch up to it and don't get trapped on that rock outcropping as the tide moves in around you (almost happened to me, folks).

Tide charts are your friend. They are incredibly accurate and give some hint at what the future holds along your favorite beach. Use them.

Fishermen

Mini Canyon