Nick Carver Photography Blog

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Website Updates: Redesigned Nature Photography Gallery

Nature Photography Gallery

The gallery section of my website has been looking a little out-dated lately, so I decided to re-design it to include more nature photography along with new sections for my portrait photography and architectural photography. It's a cleaner look, the navigation is easier, and there's an entirely new section titled "Collections." This is where you'll find my ongoing artistic studies of certain subjects or photographic styles.

My personal favorite is "The Palms Collection" - an ongoing study of multiple exposures on black and white film showcasing the iconic silhouettes of California palm trees in a unique way. I'm also just starting to dive deeper into "The Joshua Tree Collection" which is a series of images highlighting individual Joshua Trees and the unique shapes they take on. The classic black and white styling and simple compositional approach is designed to feature the individual "personalities" of these iconic yuccas as if the images were photographic portraits. And, of course, there's "The Orange County Collection," an ongoing project to capture the beaches, hills, and sunsets that grace my backyard.

I'm known much more for my nature photography than anything else, but I'm no slouch when it comes to portrait photography, so I decided to share my portraiture work (however rare it may be) in the new "People" gallery. And with plans to shoot a lot more buildings and structures in the near future, I put together a gallery of my architectural photography that is still very much in its infancy. And to showcase my completed, framed artwork, you'll find a new section called "Completed Projects." In addition to all of this you'll find new sections titled "For Art Buyers & Consultants" and "About the Artwork."

Take a break from your busy day and check out the new gallery!

Visit www.NickCarverPhotography.com/gallery

Portrait Photography Tips for Good Easy Light

Photography Tip Skill Level: Beginner

Portrait Photography Tips for Good Light

Portrait Photography Tips for Good Easy Light
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Good lighting in portrait photography can be the difference between a terrible photo and a phenomenal one. I'd go so far as to say that the lighting used is more important than the composition, the subject, the makeup, the wardrobe, the lens, the exposure settings... If you have good light, the job becomes very easy. But it seems that photographers like to overcomplicate things (shocking, I know). They start adding flash when it isn't necessary, breaking out soft boxes, umbrellas, light stands, Pocket Wizards, and who knows what else to try and get the light just right. Sure, that works great if you have the time and budget of Annie Leibovitz, but for most of us just looking to get better portrait photos without going crazy, this approach can be a bit much. So I thought I'd post this portrait photography tip about how to find good, flattering light that'll take your natural light portraits to the next level. No need to purchase anything for this portrait photography tip, you just need to move into the right position.

So a friend of mine manufactures these amazing sunglasses made out of exotic woods (keep an eye out for Knottywoods Eyewear). He dropped me a line over the holidays because he was going to be in town and wondered if I might be down for a photo shoot highlighting these awesome specs. Although you might think of me as a landscape guy, I can still snap a mean portrait and I love the opportunity to get creative on something like this.

The situation was a little tricky. We went out into a local nature park, brought some props, and started searching for a good place to set up. The tricky part was the light. It was a clear day, not a cloud in the sky, and the sun was beating down harsh on our models. If we shot in open sunlight, the shadows would be too harsh because direct sunlight is generally hideous for portraits (unless it's towards sunset or sunrise). The dark, hard-edged shadows created by the open sun exaggerate facial features and blemishes. It can also put dark shadows on people's eyes, robbing the photo of that sparkling glint in the irises. So direct sunlight was a no-go.

The second option was shooting under a tree. But that gave us mottled light - blotches of sunlight mixed in to the shadows of the branches. Also no good.

That brought us to the third option and the subject of this portrait photography tip: flat even shade. That's right, some of the best light you'll ever find for portrait photography is even shade. And when I say even shade, I just mean the shadow is big enough to completely engulf your subject - no splotches of sunlight breaking through. Whenever I'm shooting portraits in natural light outdoors, the first thing I look for is a big shadow I can throw my model into. But not just any old shadow will do. You need a shadow that has some lighting bouncing into it from the sunlit environment around it. In other words, I don't want to be so deep into a shadow that virtually no light is illuminating my subject. I want to be near the edge of the shadow so that the sunlight bouncing off the trees, clouds, ground, buildings, street, and whatever else just outside the shadow will bounce into the shadow, bathing my model in a nice, soft glow.

For this shoot, I found the shade I was looking for on the eastern side of a big oak tree. The tree was sufficiently large enough to completely block the westerly sun, casting a nice big shadow for my models to pose in. And just beyond the shadow (further to the east) was a sunlit landscape of hills and trees that kindly bounced that sunlight right back into my shadow in a huge, soft glow. As you can see in the photos, the light on my models is soft, even, and consistent. No dark eyes, no exaggerated features, no highlighting blemishes. The light is easy to work with and it results in softer skin, requiring no touch-up work in the computer. The light works very well regardless of the tools used. Here I used a DSLR and medium format Portra 160 film.

Don't make your portrait photography shoots more difficult than they need to be. Remember this portrait photography tip and just put your models in the shade. They'll be more comfortable, your job will be a lot easier, and they'll like the pictures more (which is the most important part).

Portrait Photography Tips for Good Light

Portrait Photography Tips for Good Light

Portrait Photography Tips for Good Light

Portrait Photography Tips for Good Light

Portrait Photography Tips for Good Light

Portrait Photography Tips for Good Light

Portrait Photography Tips for Good Light

Black and White Portraits


Black and White Portraits
Black and White Portraits on Ilford Delta 100 Film
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As part of my recent photo shoot with my brother using 35mm and medium format film (see part 1 here and part 2 here), I decided to try something I've never done before: black and white portraits. Okay, so maybe I've converted a few digital color portraits to black and white in the past, but I've never done true black and white portraits using black and white film. I've spent the past year or so getting comfortable with black and white photography so I figured it was high-time to apply my new experience to the world of portraiture.

I think the toughest part about black and white photography is learning to "see in black and white." With our full-color vision of the world, it's difficult to imagine what something will look like with all the color removed. Sometimes, when the color is sucked out, an otherwise gorgeous subject looks terribly bland. For example, early on in my black and white ventures, I decided to photograph a landscape that consisted of a crisp blue sky over a lush rolling green hillside. In color, the scene was gorgeous. But I found out quickly that the tonal brightness of the green grass was nearly identical to the tonal brightness of the sky. That meant that both the grass and sky desaturated to almost exactly the same shade of gray in the resulting b&w photo. There was virtually no separation between the two! Without color contrast, I had to learn to rely entirely on tonal contrast.

But this lack of color contrast is also what makes black and white photography so beautiful. Without the distraction of color, the tones and shadows can pop out and reveal a whole new beauty to the scene. In these black and white portraits, I utilized lighting that created deep, dark shadows and bright, contrasty highlights so as to add more tonal contrast and interest to the image. And when I didn't have the right light source for dark shadows (like in the photos out in the open field under diffused light), I created the necessary contrast using wardrobe. A jet-black coat over a stark white shirt helped create more tonal interest in this flat lighting.

I have a new appreciation for black and white portraits. The look intrigues me and the challenge makes the successes very rewarding.

Black and White Portraits on Ilford Delta 100 Film

Black and White Portraits on Ilford Delta 100 Film

Black and White Portraits on Ilford Delta 100 Film

Black and White Portraits on Ilford Delta 100 Film

Black and White Portraits on Ilford Delta 100 Film

Black and White Portraits on Ilford Delta 100 Film

Black and White Portraits on Ilford Delta 100 Film

Black and White Portraits on Ilford Delta 100 Film

Black and White Portraits on Ilford Delta 100 Film

Black and White Portraits on Ilford Delta 100 Film