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Photography Classes Orange County: Macro Photography

MACRO CLASS STARTS THIS SATURDAY

Photography Classes Orange County: Macro PhotographyThe next installment of my Macro DSLR Photography class starts Saturday, November 2nd at 10:00am. This class is 4 weeks long, meeting every Saturday at 10:00am-12:30pm for 4 consecutive weeks. This is an in-depth class all about macro photography so that you can learn how to get better close-up shots from your DSLR camera. Whether you're in to photographing flowers, insects, food, or just any tiny object you can point your camera at, this class will take your photos to the next level with pro techniques.

Topics covered include magnification ratio, macro lenses, extension tubes, teleconverters, close-up filters, shutter speed, aperture, ISO, getting sharper images, composition, light, and more! These class even includes an in-class field shoot so that you can practice applying these techniques with me right there to help you out. Learn how to get interesting close-ups that are tack sharp, colorful and beautifully composed.

With a small class size of only 12 students max, you'll get personalized attention and you'll never be left behind. Plus, my photography classes Orange County are highly rated amongst previous students. Please browse through my Yelp reviews or read the testimonials on my website here to see what previous enrollees had to say.

Here's what a previous student of the Macro DSLR Photography had to say about it:

"I've taken two of Nicks Courses: 4 Week Landscape Photography Course and the 4 Week Macro/Close Up Course. Nick's knowledge and professionalism in photography made these course's very enjoyable as well as a great learning experience. The class time length is sufficient and you can't beat the price! I cant wait to take another class!"

- Dave M.

Don't wait until this class fills up! Reserve your seat today for just $125! That's 10 hours of in-depth instruction featuring some of the clearest explanations on the topic of photography you'll find anywhere. More details about this course including enrollment information can be found here.

Photo a Day Challenge: Day 1

Photo a Day Challenge - Day 1 on Ilford Delta 100 FilmDoor, Window & Shadows - Irvine Ranch Historic Park
Tuesday, August 13, 2013 at 3:43pm
Click to Enlarge

I'm not the kind of photographer that takes pictures every day. I've gone whole months not taking a single photo. I tend to be more of the "I'm in picture-taking mode right now or I'm not" kind of photographer. I plan trips to be my designated picture-taking time, but you're unlikely to find me just casually taking pictures near home. I'm sure this is largely due to the fact that I prefer photographing natural landscapes but I live in Orange County, which is the poster child for destruction of open spaces and wildlands.

But recently, in the interest of expanding my creativity and challenging my skills as a photographer, I decided to give myself a "Photo a Day Challenge" wherein I had to take at least one picture every day for a month. But it wasn't as easy as take a picture a day and that's that. It was a challenge because I gave myself 3 strict rules to follow during this challenge. Those 3 rules were:

1. Take at least 1 photo a day, but no more than 4

Taking a photo a day is easy, but limiting yourself to just a few is tough. I wanted to limit the number of photos I took each day because I feel that the limitless nature of digital photography can make some photographers sloppy and uncreative. Some may disagree with that last statement and point out that digital has opened new worlds of creativity for shooters. Yes, but at the same time, how many hours have been wasted (by me alone) taking mediocre pictures because "hey it's free to take a digital photo, so why not?" I don't know about everyone else, but for me, if I know I can only take 3 or 4 photos, I'm going to really try and make each photo count. I won't waste time trying to make a lame subject work. If I limited myself to no more than 4 photos a day, I'd be forced to get creative rather than "spray and pray" that one turns out.

Now to be honest, I broke this rule a couple times but I generally held pretty strong to it. When I went to Joshua Tree National Park for one of the days, I allowed myself to take more pictures because the creative juices were really flowing that day and it was a unique circumstance. But outside of a couple of exceptions, I made sure I didn't take more than 4 photos in a day (usually no more than 2 actually).

And why 4 photos? Well, because on a single roll of medium format film, I can get 4 photos of 6x17 format. So in the event I wanted to do a panoramic, I wanted to give myself the option to finish off the entire roll on account of the fact that my panoramic camera is kind of a pain in the ass to leave unused film in.

2. Limit my tools to only medium format black and white film

As with the previous rule, this was in the interest of limiting my tools and options so as to encourage creativity. I'm a firm believer that being forced to work within limited confines often times brings out the best in artists. This idea was borne from years of teaching and studying other photographers' work. I've seen so many students come through my doors that have every possible tool available. They have money to burn and every lens you could want, but their photos are nothing unique. The photos might be well-executed and technically perfect, but nothing creative. While at the same time, I look at some shooters on the internet with no more experience or training who are getting absolutely phenomenal shots with just an old 35mm film camera and a 50mm lens.

Of course, some people are simply more talented artists than others and the tools used are not the issue. But I do believe that if you limit the tools available to an artist, he/she will be forced to turn on that right side of the brain. I definitely found this to be true in myself.

The reason I chose medium format film is two-fold. First, I just enjoy medium format film. I like the high-resolution, the detail, the camera, and its versatility. But I also liked that this would keep my shooting easier than 4x5 large format but more limited than 35mm film. And I went with black and white film because I felt this would further push my creative abilities. I'm not a veteran of B&W. Color is where I'm comfortable, so I thought it would be good to break out of my comfort zone.

And why film over digital? Come on...do you really have to ask?

3. Practice photographic celibacy

Photographic celibacy is an idea I stumbled upon from Cole Thompson (link). Cole Thompson is a very talented fine art B&W digital photographer who has the controversial idea that studying other photographers' work is not always healthy for artists. He talks about how he decided years ago to stop viewing other photographers' work in the interest of keeping his creative juices clean and untainted by subconscious copy-catting. This idea flies in the face of traditional thinking that one gets inspiration from viewing the work of your peers.

I tend to agree with Cole.

As I read Cole's thoughts on photographic celibacy, I realized that he was articulating exactly what I should have started doing years ago. I can't tell you how many times I've come across another photographer's work and spent hours examining their photos only to find myself bummed out and copying their style. I'm sure this isn't the case for everybody, but when I see another photographer's work that I feel is better than mine, I get a deep sense of discouragement and an irrational urge to start doing what they're doing. The ironic thing is that Cole Thompson's work was the most recent example of this. Thank God I stumbled upon his article on photographic celibacy while I was bumming out over his photos.

So for this photo a day challenge, I decided to practice photographic celibacy. No viewing other photographers' websites, no browsing Instagram or Flickr, no reading photography magazines or books. Of course, I made an exception for reviewing my students' assignments, but outside of that, it was total detachment from the photography community.

This rule of the challenge was without question the most refreshing and beneficial aspect of it all. I have now decided to adopt this idea permanently and I think it's the healthiest change I've ever made in my photography.

But I would like to put one modification on Cole's advice, if I may be so presumptuous. I would advise that this practice of photographic celibacy only be undertaken in the advanced stages of one's photography. When starting out, I agree with the status quo that studying other artists' work is important for inspiration and growth. Whether it's other photographers, painters, or sculptors, I think the stimulation in the beginning of your photographic career is vital. But once you get past that initial stage of copy-catting (it's taken me 13 years to get out of that stage), photographic celibacy may bring a new level of purity to your creativity.

Over the next 30 days, I will be posting my photos from my 30-day Photo a Day Challenge. I'll try to post a photo a day so that you can follow along chronologically just as I took them.

About This Photo

At top is the first photo from the series. I made this photo on Tuesday, August 13, 2013 at 3:43pm. My exposure settings were 1/125 at f/16 using my Mamiya RZ67 camera on Ilford Delta 100 film, no filters. This door is part of an old building at a park near my home in Irvine called the Irvine Ranch Historic Park. I've driven by this park nearly every week for the past 20 years, but have never ventured in. It took this photo a day challenge to get me inside and check out the scenery.

Boy am I glad I visited, because this has become my favorite place in Irvine. Why? Because it's one of the only places left in Irvine where historic buildings still stand. This park has several old buildings, a barn, and tons of appeal for me as a photographer. I love old doors and old architecture. Old buildings like this may be commonplace in other parts of the country, but in Orange County, they simply don't exist.

I returned to this park several times throughout the course of this challenge due to its proximity and photo ops. I enjoyed escaping the suburban culture for just a bit to photograph these magnificent buildings.

New: Photography Classes Orange County CA


Summer/Fall 2013
Photography Classes Orange County CA

Photography Classes Orange County CA


Macro DSLR Photography

July 27th through August 17th - Saturdays 10:00am-12:30pm in Tustin, CA
This class is 1 saturday per week for 4 weeks. Learn how to get better close-ups with your DSLR camera, what equipment you should invest in, what settings to use, how to frame a shot, how to find good light and more! Includes an in-class shoot. - 4 days (10 hrs total) - $125
Get More Info About This Class


Landscape Photography

August 22nd through September 12th - Thursdays from 6:30-9:00pm in Irvine, CA
This class is 1 evening per week for 4 weeks. It covers everything from how to shoot in manual, to using filters, to composition, to final output and much, much more. And this class is my one and only class to include a field shoot! - 4 days (10 hrs total) - $99
Get More Info About This Class


Popular Beginners Photography Class:
Understanding Exposure for Beginners

August 24th through August 31st - Saturdays 10:00am-12:30pm in Tustin, CA
Perfect for beginning photographers, this class is designed to make exposure easily understandable to even the greenest students. Learn what shooting modes to use, how to get correct exposures, and what the shutter speed, aperture, and ISO are. You'll leave this class knowing what the f-stop is, how to get blurry backgrounds, how to avoid totally blurry photos in low light, and much, much more! - 2 days (5 hrs total) - $75
Get More Info About This Class


Composition for Dramatic Landscapes

September 10th - Tuesday 6:30-9:00pm in Irvine, CA
Composition is what will make or break your landscape photographs. Don't get so caught up in the technical stuff that you forget to give due attention to the artistic side of landscape photography. - 1 day (2.5 hrs) - $39
Get More Info About This Class


How to Shoot in Manual Mode

July 2nd - Tuesday 6:30-9:00pm in Irvine, CA
Learn the correct way to shoot in manual mode in this very affordable single-evening seminar. Nick will demystify the process with his easy-to-understand and fun-to-use technique for manual metering. - 1 day (2.5 hrs) - $39
Get More Info About This Class


Filters for Outdoor Photography

September 28th - Satuday 10:00am-12:30pm in Tustin, CA
Don't be fooled by the marketing of software companies - filters are just as useful in digital photography as they've ever been! Find out what filters Photoshop can never replace and which filters are most important to keep in your bag. - 1 day (2.5 hrs) - $39
Get More Info About This Class

 

Don't wait, sign up before these photography classes fill up!
More information and enrollment details
can be found here.