Nick Carver Photography Blog

Photography Tips, Tutorials, & Videos

CONTACT  |  LOG IN
 

Monochrome at Little Corona Del Mar, Newport Beach

Little Corona Del Mar in Newport Beach, CALittle Corona Del Mar in Newport Beach, CA
Click Any Image to Enlarge

Man, oh, man...I have not been keeping up on my blog posting and image sharing like I should! Summer is a crazy busy time for me, so sharing new work has been on the back burner for awhile. But the whole point of this photography stuff is to share my photos with you lovely people! So that's why I made sure to carve out some time today to post these new pictures from Little Corona Del Mar Beach in Newport Beach, CA.

I've been to Little Corona a thousand times before, sometimes just to take pictures, but more often than not I head there with a student for a good old-fashioned Orange County private photography lesson. There is a great cluster of massive rock formations to the north end of the beach that has had my lens pointed at it more times than I can count. And it's a really good place to practice manual metering and filter use for landscape photography with my students.

Since I obtained a Lee Big Stopper 10-stop neutral density filter, I've been playing around a lot with ultra-long shutter speeds. It's a lot of fun getting that shutter speed down in the 30-second to 2-minute range when photographing the ocean because it turns the water into an ethereal fog that departs wildly from reality. And there's something about these ultra-long exposures at the beach with a nice cluster of rocks that just looks awesome in black and white. It takes a pretty basic landscape scene and turns it into a work of art. Sure, it ain't postcard material, but who wants that anyway? The resulting look is more suited for large wall art or a nice calendar image.

I did all of these photos on analog black and white film, but the techniques are the same with digital. You need a low ISO (my film was ISO 200), a small aperture (f/22 or f/32 on all of these) and a nice dark neutral density filter to hold back the light even more. The name of the game is "cut down light coming through the lens as much as possible" so that the shutter speed can slow way down. Oh, and best be using a rock-solid tripod because there is no way you're holding the camera still for this long!

The shutter speed for the first 2 pictures came out to 1 minute. Over the course of one minute, the water advances and retreats so many times that all you get is a nice layer of fog crawling through the gaps between the rocks. I love the way it complements these rock formations at Corona Del Mar with their almost Gothic shape rising up out of the mist. The final shot featured here utilized a shutter speed of only 1 second on account of the brighter light source and lack of ND filter. The movement of the seaweed winding between the boulders was a nice little surprise when I developed the film.

If you're in Orange County, head down to Little Corona Del Mar Beach in Newport Beach sometime. It's worth an exposure or two.

Little Corona Del Mar in Newport Beach, CA

Little Corona Del Mar in Newport Beach, CA

 

Large Wall Art: 7-Foot Wide Panorama

Large Wall Art - Panoramic Photography by Nick CarverLarge Wall Art: Nick Carver and the 7-Foot Wide Beast
Click Any Image to Enlarge

I recently made a large wall art piece for a client to hang in his TrueCar executive office in Goleta, CA. I've made some large wall art before. My record is 10-foot wide, a panoramic view of Sedona, AZ that hangs proudly in my Tustin classroom. But on the 10-foot wide piece, I broke up it into 3 smaller pieces, forming a triptych, simply because it's nearly impossible (or prohibitively expensive) to create a single piece that large.

Large Wall Art - Panoramic Photography by Nick Carver

For this wall art at TrueCar, we were looking at doing a 6-foot wide print with a 4" double mat and a 2" frame. All in all, the piece would measure 7-foot edge-to-edge when it was complete. Since we were going with traditional matting, doing a triptych wouldn't look right. The gaps between prints would be distracting. So the goal was to do a single continuous piece framed under glass.

Before this, I'd never done a piece this large with glass. The triptych hanging in my Tustin classroom is float-mounted with plexiglass and no frame. Doing it under a single pane of glass presents a different set of challenges. Thankfully my framer, Salamon Art in Fountain Valley, provided much needed guidance on this process. I learned from the head honcho over there that matting prints this big is so uncommon that there are only 2 colors available for matting: white and warm-white. Good thing that's what we wanted anyway. The next challenge was glazing (meaning the glass). They don't make glass this big for picture framing. We could get a pane specially made, but that would cost a fortune. Thank God for acrylic. Acrylic glazing made the whole piece surprisingly lightweight compared to glass and it made the materials far more affordable.

I typically like high-gloss metallic prints, especially for landscapes like this, but I decided to go with a regular matte finish paper. It was a tough decision because I don't really like matte photo paper, but it was the right decision. High-gloss prints this big become distractingly riddled with ripples and reflections. Also, it's a good idea to do really dark photos in a dull finish. High-gloss picks up reflections even worse when the picture is dark. If you got yourself a really bright composition, though, gloss can look great. The printing was done, as always, by the experts at Pro Photo Connection in Irvine. It's the only place I trust with my prints. This photo, by the way, is a 6x17 panoramic made on Fuji Velvia 50 film in Rancho Palos Verdes, CA.

Sunset at Rancho Palos Verdes

The finished piece came out great, it was huge, it didn't break on transport (my biggest worry), and it looked gorgeous hanging on this exec's wall. As I've said before, getting the photo framed and hanging on someone else's wall is the ultimate reward of photography. Feels good.

On to the next one.