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Guest Blog Post: How Does the iPhone 6 Camera Stack Up?

Hi, folks! Nick Carver here. I have another guest blog post for you, this time by Charles Bell all about the new iPhone 6 Camera. Enjoy!

iPhone 6 Camera Review by Charles Bell

At this point, you have surely heard about Apple's latest smartphone, the iPhone 6. After spending some time with the device over the past few weeks, I wanted to share some thoughts on how the phone's camera stacks up and whether or not it's a useful tool for photographers on the go.

Personally, I try to make sure that my camera is with me at all times—you never know when you can get that perfect shot—but it can be cumbersome lugging it around. That's why I sometimes look to my phone to get the photos I may otherwise miss, and that's also why I was curious to see how the new iPhone's camera performed. Sometimes, your smartphone is really all you have.

As for the phone itself, there were three features that instantly impressed me when I began shooting: The clarity, the lens, and the autofocus. Starting with the clarity, I have been able to achieve such pristine images with the phone that sometimes I forget I'm actually taking photos with a phone. It's worth noting, though, that I made the jump from the iPhone 4, so the increase in clarity may not necessarily be there if you own a 5 or 5s. As for the lens, it provides the ability to achieve an almost-wide lens view. It's not going to match the power or capabilities of your SLR, but it does capture a whole lot more than previous iPhones. It's a little jarring that the lens sticks out of the back, but you'll get used to it.

And then there's the autofocus, which is incredibly fast and a huge jump over its predecessors. I've been able to get some great shots that would otherwise be blurry or out-of-focus on my older phone (and I'd love to share them but my screen is being fixed because I dropped it. Sigh.) It makes sense, then, that  Verizon Wireless touts the autofocus as the biggest improvement to the camera in their listing of the phone. It's true—what you're mostly here for is the improved autofocus, which often targets your subject so quickly that it's surprising. However, if you want a truly improved experience, apparently you'd be better off going with the iPhone 6 Plus.

Although I only have the 6, which means I can't personally attest to this, reviewer  Jim Harmer notes that the Plus has some significantly better features than its not-quite-as-pricy counterpart. He, too, pointed to the improved focus, but he also mentioned the optical image stabilization (the regular 6 only has a digital feature). Additionally, it seems like the Plus does better shooting images at night and in other low-light settings, especially when compared to the previous incarnations of the iPhone.

Another reviewer, Amadou Diallo of Forbes, brings up the fact that Apple may be holding out on an iPhone 6s. And if you own a 5s, he recommends that you sit tight before throwing down some cash for the 6 or 6 Plus. He, too, makes mention of the noteworthy autofocus, though many of the other improvements are found simply by upgrading to iOS 8. You can do that if you own a 4s or better, so, again, he suggests holding out for the 6s. However—and here's where we definitely agree—he recommends that "it’s time to consider moving up to the larger screen, higher resolution low light images, and the convenience of Touch ID" if your phone is a 5 or older.

I also concur with Diallo on this point: "But if you want an Apple device, the iPhone 6 is the best camera the company’s made yet." That's really the most important part here, isn't it? So many folks are loyal to their smartphone brand that they probably already have the latest device or are working toward acquiring it. They're aware that there are differences that can make certain phones better than others, but what it really comes down to is what you like. If you prefer Apple devices and need a damn-good camera attached to it, don't sleep on the iPhone 6 for too long.

Charles Bell is a freelance writer who contributes content to several online publications. 

Guest Blog Post: Photography in Motion

Hi, folks! Nick Carver here. Today I wanted to try something new. Below is a guest blog post by Molly Stillman all about taking pictures of subjects in motion. Check out more of Molly's work at Artsy Couture. Enjoy!

Photography in MotionPhotography in Motion - Photo by Nick Carver, Article by Molly Stillman

You know that picture — the one of the exact moment the wide receiver catches the winning touchdown. The one of the bullet busting through the glass. The one of the droplet of water falling from the leaf.

Super-exact moments in time. Beautiful details captured in a way that the human eye can barely see, yet that particular photographer was able to frame a beautiful moment in a way that no one else could.

But how does that photographer do it? How is the average semi-professional, professional or even hobbyist photographer supposed to capture that moment in motion so perfectly?

It’s high-speed photography at its finest — and it’s not as hard to do as you might think!

Now, don’t get me wrong, there are people that study and practice the craft and art of high-speed photography for years. It’s not something that you’re going to become an expert in overnight. And certainly, I’m not going to be able to teach you all the tips and tricks in one little blog post — there are entire books on the subject. There’s also a ton of equipment out there — timing devices, flash units, etc. that can aid in getting that perfect moment. But you don’t have to have those when you’re just starting out and getting the hang of things.

When I started learning photography as a hobby, I was the sideline photographer for the football games at UNC Chapel Hill, and all I had was my entry-level DSLR and a zoom lens. I didn’t have the fancy expensive equipment other photographers had, yet I was still able to capture many of those exciting moments without them being a total blur.

There are some things that you can do starting today to practice and begin to learn the basis of the art of high-speed photography, before you start investing in other equipment.

Understand shutter speed
The core of high-speed photography is all about the shutter speed on your camera. In the technical sense, high-speed photography refers to any image captured at 1/1000 of a second or shorter (1 millisecond or shorter). That is, ultimately, the speed at which the shutter opens and closes. That’s pretty fast if you ask me. So, the more you are able to practice shooting at extremely fast shutter speeds, the better. [Editor's Note: Check out the free video & lesson guide here explaining the shutter speed]

Practice outdoors
If you understand manual photography, you know that the faster the shutter speed, the less light that is let in (because there is less time for light to enter the lens). So, the more light you can give yourself to work with as you practice, the better.

Use the continuous shooting (aka “burst”) mode
Select the continuous shooting mode on your camera and click away. This can help to alleviate some of the delay that often occurs in high-speed photography, which can cause you to miss the moment or blur the images.

Grab a buddy and start with something small
Have a friend help you by bringing a cup of water outside and have them slowly pour the water on a leaf — we’re talking slowly here. One drop at a time. Then, play around with your manual settings at 1/1000 of a second and shorter to see what kind of results you get. You will likely (or definitely) need to adjust your aperture and ISO to get the right lighting adjustment the shorter you make your shutter speed. Then, using the burst mode, start snapping away. See what works. See what doesn’t. In the beginning, it’s all about trial and error.

Once you really start getting the basics down of what you’re able to capture at what short shutter speeds, you can start exploring more advanced techniques and introduce equipment like timing devices and flashes.

Then, you’re well on your way to shooting that Pulitzer Prize-winning image. Or, you’re at least ready to try.

Molly Stillman is a writer for Artsy Couture. She is a marketing executive, blogger, mama, and wife. She also is extremely passionate about lifestyle and portrait photography and loves encouraging others in the pursuits of their goals and dreams.