Nick Carver Photography Blog

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Guest Blog Post: Photography in Motion

Hi, folks! Nick Carver here. Today I wanted to try something new. Below is a guest blog post by Molly Stillman all about taking pictures of subjects in motion. Check out more of Molly's work at Artsy Couture. Enjoy!

Photography in MotionPhotography in Motion - Photo by Nick Carver, Article by Molly Stillman

You know that picture — the one of the exact moment the wide receiver catches the winning touchdown. The one of the bullet busting through the glass. The one of the droplet of water falling from the leaf.

Super-exact moments in time. Beautiful details captured in a way that the human eye can barely see, yet that particular photographer was able to frame a beautiful moment in a way that no one else could.

But how does that photographer do it? How is the average semi-professional, professional or even hobbyist photographer supposed to capture that moment in motion so perfectly?

It’s high-speed photography at its finest — and it’s not as hard to do as you might think!

Now, don’t get me wrong, there are people that study and practice the craft and art of high-speed photography for years. It’s not something that you’re going to become an expert in overnight. And certainly, I’m not going to be able to teach you all the tips and tricks in one little blog post — there are entire books on the subject. There’s also a ton of equipment out there — timing devices, flash units, etc. that can aid in getting that perfect moment. But you don’t have to have those when you’re just starting out and getting the hang of things.

When I started learning photography as a hobby, I was the sideline photographer for the football games at UNC Chapel Hill, and all I had was my entry-level DSLR and a zoom lens. I didn’t have the fancy expensive equipment other photographers had, yet I was still able to capture many of those exciting moments without them being a total blur.

There are some things that you can do starting today to practice and begin to learn the basis of the art of high-speed photography, before you start investing in other equipment.

Understand shutter speed
The core of high-speed photography is all about the shutter speed on your camera. In the technical sense, high-speed photography refers to any image captured at 1/1000 of a second or shorter (1 millisecond or shorter). That is, ultimately, the speed at which the shutter opens and closes. That’s pretty fast if you ask me. So, the more you are able to practice shooting at extremely fast shutter speeds, the better. [Editor's Note: Check out the free video & lesson guide here explaining the shutter speed]

Practice outdoors
If you understand manual photography, you know that the faster the shutter speed, the less light that is let in (because there is less time for light to enter the lens). So, the more light you can give yourself to work with as you practice, the better.

Use the continuous shooting (aka “burst”) mode
Select the continuous shooting mode on your camera and click away. This can help to alleviate some of the delay that often occurs in high-speed photography, which can cause you to miss the moment or blur the images.

Grab a buddy and start with something small
Have a friend help you by bringing a cup of water outside and have them slowly pour the water on a leaf — we’re talking slowly here. One drop at a time. Then, play around with your manual settings at 1/1000 of a second and shorter to see what kind of results you get. You will likely (or definitely) need to adjust your aperture and ISO to get the right lighting adjustment the shorter you make your shutter speed. Then, using the burst mode, start snapping away. See what works. See what doesn’t. In the beginning, it’s all about trial and error.

Once you really start getting the basics down of what you’re able to capture at what short shutter speeds, you can start exploring more advanced techniques and introduce equipment like timing devices and flashes.

Then, you’re well on your way to shooting that Pulitzer Prize-winning image. Or, you’re at least ready to try.

Molly Stillman is a writer for Artsy Couture. She is a marketing executive, blogger, mama, and wife. She also is extremely passionate about lifestyle and portrait photography and loves encouraging others in the pursuits of their goals and dreams.

 

What is a Full Frame DSLR Camera?

View on YouTube for full HD version

In my line of work as a photography instructor, I get a ton of questions from students about full frame DSLR cameras. The number one question is "should I get one?" I've addressed that common question previously in a blog post titled "Photography Tips: Do I Need a Full Frame Camera?" But it occurred to me recently that many of these people asking the question aren't even clear on what exactly a full frame DSLR camera is. And most people don't realize why we have the 2 systems - full frame and crop sensor - in the first place.

So let's put the first matter to rest: no, you shouldn't necessarily get a full frame DSLR camera. It depends on what your needs and wants are, and it depends on what you like shooting and how you like shooting it. Full frame DSLR cameras are not better than crop sensor cameras and your pictures won't necessarily turn out better. I know, I know, the guys on Flickr said you absolutely have to get a full frame DSLR, but trust me, it won't make your pictures better. But for a full rundown of that, please check out the article linked above. It'll really clear things up.

Now let's address the more basic question of "What is a full frame DSLR camera?" And to best make sense of this full frame business, let's take a look back at film.

Okay, so when film was the only option (waaaaay back in the 1990's), a film format called 35mm was the most popular film size available. In fact, when most people imagine film, what they're envisioning is the 35mm film system. But there were bigger film sizes like 6x6, 6x7, 4x5, 8x10 and bigger, and there were also smaller film sizes like the APS film system. 35mm film just so happened to strike that perfect balance between ease of use and affordability with decent resolution and versatility. The bigger film systems like medium format and large format required more skill, more expense, and bigger cameras. Grandma Gertrude shooting little Johnny's birthday party wasn't interested in that. The smaller film formats were easy to use and cheap, but good luck getting a decent 11x14 print out of it. So 35mm was "the goldilocks option," not too big, not too small...juuuust right.

Full Frame DSLR Camera35mm Film Image Area

When digital first hit the scene, there were all these amateur and professional photographers out there who had cameras and lenses and accessories all designed for their 35mm film systems. They were itching for a digital DSLR - a digital version of their trusty 35mm film cameras. They wanted to use their same lenses and accessories, but just on a digital camera body.

"You got it," said the camera makers, "we'll convert some of our film cameras into digital cameras for you by putting a digital sensor in place of the film. But here's the thing...if we make the digital sensor as big as your 35mm film (24mm tall by 36mm wide), the camera is going to cost more than you're willing to pay. So we'll work out a compromise with you - we'll make you a digital SLR camera that uses all your 35mm lenses and accessories, BUT we're going to put a smaller sensor in there, one that measures the same size as APS film - just 16.7mm tall by 25.1mm wide."

APS-C Crop Sensor DSLR
APS-C Digital Sensor Image Area

So then, the first affordable "35mm" DSLR cameras didn't actually have a 35mm sensor in them, they had the smaller APS-C sensor. From the outside, you couldn't tell any difference - the cameras looked the same and operated the same. But since the sensor was smaller, the image appeared cropped from what it looked like on film. This made it look like a given lens was more zoomed in on the DSLR than it was on the film SLR. That was good for shooters who liked to photograph far away subjects, like wildlife shooters and sports shooters, but it was a real bummer for shooters who liked wide angle lenses. On the DSLR, their wide angle lenses didn't look wide angle anymore. But luckily, camera makers quickly remedied that. They just invented a new lens for DSLR cameras that could go even wider. So today, full frame or crop sensor, you can go just as wide angle on either.

Of course, technology caught up and eventually it became affordable to make a digital sensor equal to the full size of 35mm film. They called those "full-frame sensors" because they were equal in size to the full frame of 35mm. But the crop sensors were already out on the market and we couldn't un-ring that bell.

Really, we don't need both full-frame and crop sensors today, but each has their benefits, so we might as well keep both around. Plus, it gives camera makers a good excuse to upsell their customers. "Hey your pictures aren't coming out so good on your crop sensor camera? Well try this snake oil full-frame camera. It'll solve all your photography woes." I'm just pulling your legs, Nikon, Canon, and Sony. You know I love you guys.

Be sure to watch the video at the top of this post for some good visuals on what I've described here. And check out the full-frame offerings from Canon, Nikon, and Sony at the following links:

- View Canon Full-Frame DSLR cameras at B&H
- View Nikon Full-Frame DSLR cameras at B&H
- View Sony Full-Frame DSLR cameras at B&H

Thanks for reading.

Why the Exposure Triangle is Completely Useless

Understanding Exposure: Why the Exposure Triangle method is complete BS

The "exposure triangle" is a common tool for teaching beginners about exposure. But here's the truth about the exposure triangle: it's a terrible learning tool that is more likely to harm than help beginner photographers. I believe this tool is adopted by teachers who actually aren't that good at teaching a simple concept. They can't communicate shutter speed, aperture, ISO, and exposure in an effective way, so they teach via this "learning trick."

The Problem with The Exposure Triangle

Take it from someone who teaches photography for a living: the exposure triangle makes the simple concept of exposure seem much more complicated than it is. I know exposure, shutter speed, aperture, and ISO better than I know myself and I can barely make sense of the exposure triangle. I'm serious. It's comical how unnecessarily complicated it is. It's like watching one of those Rube Goldberg machines that turns the simple task of toasting bread into a thousand-step process.

But aside from the fact that it's overly complicated, the inherent problem with the exposure triangle is that it relies on memorization rather than understanding. You are expected to visualize a diagram with shutter speed, aperture, and ISO labeled at each respective corner, trying to remember which corner means more light, which one means less light, which side deals with motion blur, which side deals with depth of field... Unless you have a photographic memory, you're going to have to carry along an exposure triangle cheat sheet for reference.

So then what's wrong with carrying around a cheat sheet? Well, taking pictures with the help of a cheat sheet is like trying to ask a girl out on a date using a pre-written script - it'll work until she says something you weren't prepared for. The "cheat sheet" method of shooting is too slow and too inflexible. You have to be able to think fast, think on your feet, and adapt to situations quickly. An exposure triangle cheat sheet can't do that.

The Better Way to Think About Exposure

The way I teach my students about exposure doesn't rely on memory tricks like the exposure triangle because learning by memorization doesn't work. Memories can't be trusted. But if you understand how something works, then you'll almost never forget it and the whole process becomes easy. So let's talk about how to understand exposure so that we no longer need to rely on memory.

For now, let's ignore all the numbers connected to shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. The numbers are secondary, first you must understand the mechanics of exposure. If you think about the mechanics of how an exposure is made, then you'll be able to problem solve any exposure situation - no need for an exposure triangle cheat sheet. The numbers will follow.

How Exposure Works

Creating an exposure is simply the process of recording light on a photosensitive material. Traditionally that light was recorded on film, now digital cameras record light with a photo-sensitive computer chip called the "image sensor." Getting a "correct exposure" means that you recorded the correct amount of light - not too much, not too little. If you didn't record enough light, the picture would be "underexposed" or "too dark." If you recorded too much light, the picture would be "overexposed" or "too bright."

Light is made up of particles just like anything else. It's almost like water, except we can't touch it or feel it. Getting the right amount of light to your sensor is a little like getting the right amount of water to a sponge. So let's forget light for a minute. Let's talk about water.

Let's say I have a big sponge that I want to saturate with exactly 20 ounces of water from a garden hose. I can't have too much or too little - it needs to have just the right amount of water in it. And let's say I have to turn on my garden hose for exactly 1 second to get my 20 ounces. Simple enough: Garden hose turned on for 1 second and I get my 20 ounces.

Well what's going to happen if I switch out my garden hose for a fire hose? Will I have to leave my faucet on for longer or shorter now that I have a bigger hose?

Shorter. Duh. It's a bigger hose, so more water comes out, so I won't need to turn it on so long. Now how did you figure this out? Did you refer to your "water, hose, faucet triangle" on your "water triangle cheat sheet"? No, you just thought about it. This is how you should think with light and exposure. Don't rely on an exposure triangle, just think about the flow of light to your image sensor. The sensor in the back of your camera - the thing that creates the image - works just like a sponge, but instead of soaking up water, it soaks up light.

How exposure works: DSLR Camera mirror

Above is an image looking into the camera with the lens off. This is the camera "at rest" meaning it's not taking a picture right now. You'll notice there's a mirror there. That allows you to see what the lens sees before taking the picture. 

Below is an image looking into the camera while it's taking a picture. The green box in the back is the image sensor. That's what collects light (like a sponge) and turns it into an image. The mirror has to move up out of the way so the sensor can soak up the light. When the photo is done, the mirror will go back down. 

How exposure works: the digital image sensor

The aperture inside the lens is simply an adjustable opening in the lens that allows you to let more or less light through. This would be like the size of the hose. Which one of the following aperture openings would let in more light? Of course, the larger opening will.

Above is a wide aperture (low f-number), below is a small aperture (high f-number).
Guess which one will let more light through...

The shutter is the mechanism that "opens up the flow" of light to the sensor. It's like turning on the faucet. Which of the following shutter speeds (that's the duration of time the shutter is open) will let more light through: 1/100 of a second or 1/2 of a second? Well, 1/100 of a second is a much shorter time period than 1/2 of a second, so 1/2 of a second will let more light through.

How exposure works: the shutter

Here is a view of the shutter with the mirror held up out of the way. You'll notice the shutter is a set of overlapping blades that blocks the sensor from light. It keeps in the sensor in complete darkness until you actually take a photo. When you do, the shutter snaps up out of the way like a window shade so that light can soak into the sensor. When the picture is done, the shutter goes back down to block off the light. 

When you make an exposure, the shutter opens up, light flows through the aperture opening, soaks into the image sensor like water soaking into a sponge, then the shutter closes off the flow of light once enough light has been recorded.

Shutter opens > light flows through aperture > image sensor soaks up light > shutter closes. Faucet opens > water flows through hose > sponge soaks up water > faucet closes. It really is that simple. Here's a diagram demonstrating the concept:

Understanding Exposure: How exposure works on a DSLR camera

In the diagram above, you can see the aperture, shutter, and sensor all indicated along with how their setting is measured (the aperture is measured by the f-stop, the shutter is measured by the shutter speed, and the sensor is measured by the ISO). 

In the diagram below, the labels are gone to remove the clutter. This is how your camera looks when it's not taking a picture - when it's "at rest":

Understanding Exposure: How exposure works on a DSLR camera

When you take a picture, all these mechanisms have to work together to get light to the sensor so it can soak up the light and create an image. It goes like this: The mirror moves up out of the way, the aperture closes down to whatever you set it to, the shutter opens up, and the sensor soaks up the light to create an image, like this...

Understanding Exposure: How exposure works on a DSLR camera

...above is a diagram of the camera as it looks while it's taking a picture.

Some time later - maybe 1 second later, maybe 1/8000 of a second later depending on the chosen shutter speed - the camera can cease collecting light. The shutter closes to shut off the light, the aperture opens back up, and the mirror goes back down. Like this:

...now it's back to it's "resting position" ready to take another photo.

So again, shutter opens > light flows through aperture > image sensor soaks up light > shutter closes. No need to make it more complicated than that.

 

Changing One Setting Affects the Other

Much of what the exposure triangle is trying to illustrate is that if you adjust one setting (shutter, aperture, or ISO), then another setting will have to change, too, assuming you want to keep the exposure the same (i.e. collect the same amount of light). But again, you don't need an exposure triangle to understand this. It's as simple as trying to get water into a sponge. If I use a wider hose to feed water into that sponge, I won't have to leave the hose on so long. If I use a narrower hose, I'll need to leave the flow on longer. Simple.

It's no trickier than this with exposure in photography. If I open up my aperture wider, then I won't need to leave the shutter open so long (the shutter speed will be faster). If I close the aperture down to a smaller opening, I'll need to leave the shutter open longer to make up for the loss of light. More on the aperture, less on the shutter. Less on the shutter, more on the aperture. You get the idea.

But what about the ISO? Well, let's say I had some way of making my sponge (the image sensor) much better at soaking up light. In other words, I was able to increase its absorbency. Well, if I have a more absorbent sponge in my water analogy, I wouldn't need to leave the faucet on so long since it's better at soaking up water. Same goes for light. If I can make my image sensor more absorbent to light, it won't need so much time to soak it up. This is what raising the ISO does. When you increase the ISO number, you're making the image sensor more absorbent to light. As a result, the shutter will only need to "turn the flow on" for a brief time. This is why raising the ISO results in faster shutter speeds.

The Bottom Line

The exposure triangle doesn't work. It's a terrible learning tool. There is no shortcut to learning the shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. Exposure is a concept that must be understood, not memorized. Cheat sheets and the exposure triangle won't get you there. Of course you won't be an expert from this short 1,000-word explanation either. My goal here is only to show you that there is a way to understand these things through logic, analogies, and simple physics without the need for a confusing exposure triangle that relies on memorization. There is much more to it that my short summary here. This is just a foundation. That's why more than half my Introduction to DSLR Photography online course is devoted to these things alone.

Sorry to throw a sales pitch at ya, but if you want to learn these things fully, check out my Introduction to DSLR Photography online course here (perfect for beginner photographers) and in my How to Shoot in Full Manual online course here (for intermediate to advanced shooters). With a clear, concise explanation aided by example images, diagrams, and videos, you can learn exposure better than any exposure triangle can deliver.

Please download the free lesson guide and video with the full explanation of shutter speed here. Download the free lesson guide and video fully explaining the aperture here.

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